Angel \”Java\” Lopez on Blog

July 22, 2014

ClojSharp Implementing Clojure In C# (1) The Project

Since the past decade I’m interested on Clojure. It’s a return to Lisp, but in modern times.. Clojure is implemented on the Java virtual machine, but is also implemented on. NET (AFAIK, using Dynamic Language Runtime). The version of Java compiles to Java bytecodes. There is also a version of JavaScript, called ClojureScript. The community is very active, and has brought an air of renewal within Java. It has features like immutability of his work-oriented structures in multithreading, avoiding concurrency problems. It supports Software Transactional Memory, but has been less used by what I see. Web frameworks have emerged, and has a project and dependencies manager called Leiningen. Some links in my Clojure posts.

To deliberate practice TDD (Test-Driven Development) and C#, I was building an interpreter (not a compiler to bytecodes, yet). The project:

https://github.com/ajlopez/ClojSharp

Current status:

It has a class library project, and a test project. There is also a REPL (Read Eval Print Loop) simple console application.

In Lisp, an expressions is composed by a verb and arguments, written in a list enclosed by parenthesis. For example, a list that at evaluation returns the sum of 1, 2 and 3:

(+ 1 2 3)

Here, the plus + sign is a symbol that in Lisp/Clojure refers to a form. A form receives arguments, operates on them, and returns a result. A typical form receives its arguments as evaluated expressions: the expressions are evaluated BEFORE the evaluation of the form:

(+ 1 (- 3 4) 3)

In the above example, the first argument to plus is a constant 1, and the second argument is an expression that is evaluated to –1 before the evaluation of the outer list.

But there are forms that not need evaluated arguments. They receive the arguments without evaluation. They are called special forms. I have implemented:

And I have implemented some (non special) forms as primitives in C#. Most of them could be implemented in Lisp itself, but being so basic that I preferred to implement them directly in C#, using TDD as usual:

Next topics: the Machine implementation, Context, how to use Parser and Lexer, more about expression evaluation, macros, tail recursion, etc.

Stay tuned!

Angel “Java” Lopez

http://www.ajlopez.com

http://twitter.com/ajlopez

2 Comments »

  1. How does this differ from ClojureCLR?

    Comment by tbcpp — July 22, 2014 @ 5:32 pm

    • Thanks for your interest.

      It’s an interpreter, not a compiler (ClojureCLR uses DLR, AFAIK)

      And I understand the code 😉 (written to practice TDD)

      Comment by ajlopez — July 22, 2014 @ 7:23 pm


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